Editorials, Travel Inspiration  • 

5 most incredible places in Sardinia

March 25, 2015

Sardinian beaches

Sardinia, an Italian island on the Mediterranean, is mostly visited for its top-rate beaches and great weather. What most of the tourists are missing though is one of the oldest and most mysterious cultures of Europe, deep forest ravines and one-of-a-kind natural wonders. Each day of my visits to Sardinia was a great adventure and it was hard to choose the most unforgettable experiences, but here goes:

Su Nuraxi

Sardinia nuraghes

Sardinia had for centuries remained the home of a mysterious Nuragic civilization, who built distinctive megalithic towns, fortresses and temples, generally called nuraghes. Though they left over 7 thousand of those monuments around Sardinia, little is known about those people, their religion, origin or even the purpose of their constructions.

The most famous place to explore the mystifying nuraghes is Su Nuraxi site near Barumini town – maybe you will be the one to solve the mystery of ancient Sardinian people…?

Golgo plateau

Donkey in Sardinia

The best place to get to the most beautiful beaches in Sardinia – Cala Goloritze and Cala Sisine. Golgo is interesting by itself, with its San Pietro church, donkey pastures, natural swimming pools and… the biggest sinkhole in Europe. Su Sterru might not look impressive, but the though that this 270 metres (885 ft) deep hole was used for human sacrifice can give you the chills.

Capo Caccia

Neptune's Grotto Sardinia

The peninsula near Alghero town has a lot to offer to the tourists who visit it: panoramic views on the sea, great beaches and the famous Neptune’s Grotto. This 4 km long cave, with many of its chambers hidden under water, is one of the most prominent attractions of the island. Even the steep stairs by the sea are worth a visit.

Orgosolo

Sardinia Orgosolo

This town in Sardinian mountains is famous for murals created here since 1968. The paintings tell the history of Italy but also engage in political and social discussion. Artists, even from outside Sardinia, are encouraged to add their own murals.

Visiting Orgosolo can be interesting from another reason: its locals are native Sardinians, unlike the Italians on the coast. Though they now speak the same language, their heritage is different from the rest of Italy which is clearly visible in small towns like this one.

Cala Goloritze

Cala Goloritze

Cala Goloritze remains my favourite place on Earth and I still can’t even believe I’ve even been there! Turquoise waters and rock formations distinguish Cala Goloritze from other beaches in Sardinia and, as it’s unaccessible by car, the number of tourists isn’t overwhelming. You, too can get to this paradise by taking a trekking route from Golgo plateau (1,5 hour one way) or renting a boat.

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