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South America

Travel Inspiration  • 

The last Inca rope bridge in the world

November 7, 2014

Handwoven rope bridges were once common in the Inca empire and were used to cross its high gorges, canyons and rivers. Inca didn’t use wheeled transport and those constructions were perfect for people and livestock. Most of the bridges decayed or have been removed, but one remained to these days – Q’eswachaka (Keshwa chaca) in Peru.

36 metres long, it hangs 68 metres above Apurimac river. Its age is unknown, but it was probably built between 13th and 15th century. People from a nearby village Huinchiri have been caring for Q’eswachaka and renewing it during an annual festival in June. And yes, it’s safe to walk on and local people still use it!

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Locals renewing the bridge. Photo: Estrella Vivanco-Stevenson

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Renewing the Q’eswachaka bridge. Photo: Estrella Vivanco-Stevenson

Travel Inspiration  •  , ,

10 wonders of South America you have to see in your lifetime

November 3, 2014

Photo: Wayne Pinkston

Photo: Wayne Pinkston

If you’re traveling to South America, deciding what to visit there might be pretty tough. This continent’s lush forests, exotic wildlife and beautiful mountain ranges make it one of the most exciting and places in the world. Those were pretty hard to choose, but here are top 10 legendary spots in South America which will hopefully inspire you to travel!

Easter Island, Chile

Most isolated inhabited island Rapa Nui is known for its unique culture and religion which produced 887 colossal statues – moai. It’s still unknown how those figures how erected, which makes me want to see them even more!

Iguazu Falls, Brazil and Argentina

Huge waterfall on the border of Brazil and Argentina, with 275 drops as high as 85 metres. You can see all of Iguazu’s magnificence from a helicopter or the walkways above the water.

Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia

The world’s largest salt flat. When its ground is moist, it seems like the sky and land blend together.

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Galapagos Islands, Ecuador

Known for their rich fauna which inspired Darwin and many naturalists after him, Galapagos archipelago attracts more and more tourists each year. Some of the unique animals you can observe are tortoises, sea lions, penguins and iguanas.

Torres del Paine National Park, Chile

This one should probably be named “The Hiker’s Heaven”. Torres del Paine has panoramas of unreal mountain ranges, valleys, lakes and glaciers. The national park is between Patagonian steppes and subpolar forests and offers best of both.

Machu Picchu, Peru

The icon of the Inca civilization, built on 2,5 kilometre high mountain in 15th century; attracts massive amount of tourists and… llamas!

Lake Atitlan, Guatemala

The deepest lake in Central America, it is surrounded by three volcanoes. In the villages by the lake the Maya culture is still prevalent and traditional clothing is worn.

Fernando de Noronha, Brazil

A huge archipelago offshore from Brazil, which includes 21 islands. To protect the many species living on the islands, an environmental preservation fee is charged from tourists.

Perito Moreno Glacier, Argentina

Located in Los Glaciares national park, Perito Moreno is a huge water reservoir and one of the few glaciers in the world that is actually still growing. There’s a walkway to the south face of Perito Moreno, which allows tourists to appreciate the glacier safely.

Atacama desert, Chile

This huge desert in Chile is the driest place in the world – some of the weather stations set on it have never received any rain. Even the mountains as high as 6 000 metres aren’t covered in snow – and have never been.

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Lama in front of the Licancabur Volcano. Photo: Gunther Wegner

Travel Inspiration  • 

El Tatio geyser in Chile photographed by Owen Perry

September 24, 2014

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Canadian photographer Owen Perry took these photos of El Tatio geyser field in Chile. As El Tatio has over 80 active geysers, it’s the third biggest field in the world. Visitors usually get there in the morning to see columns of steam condensing in cold air – Owen writes that it can be as cold as -12 degrees! Still, it’s absolutely worth going there, as minerals form beautiful patterns and colours.

Discover more work of Owen Perry on his website – circa1983.

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